Ihedioha

Sacked Governor of Imo State, Emeka Ihedioha of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) will on Monday (today) approach the Supreme Court for a review of its judgment of January 14, 2019, in which it declared Senator Hope Uzodinma of the All Progressives Congress (APC) as governor of the state.

An associate of the sacked governor, Dr. Manzo Abubakar, disclosed this in Abuja at a press conference in which a group of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) reviewed judgment, and queried the rationale behind the Supreme Court’s decision.

Sacked Governor of Imo State, Emeka Ihedioha of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) will on Monday (today) approach the Supreme Court for a review of its judgment of January 14, 2019, in which it declared Senator Hope Uzodinma of the All Progressives Congress (APC) as governor of the state.

An associate of the sacked governor, Dr. Manzo Abubakar, disclosed this in Abuja at a press conference in which a group of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) reviewed judgment, and queried the rationale behind the Supreme Court’s decision.

The CSOs noted that, the Supreme Court, by the judgment has denied the Imo people the opportunity to choose their leaders, adding that, “we sympathise with their Lordships, as mortals who are not infallible.

“To err is human. It would be practically impossible for any human to have read briefs and record of proceedings exceeding 5000 pages in the matter within 2 hours after hearing, when it also had pressure of time to deliver judgment in the remaining pending governorship appeals. No doubt, this accounted for the mistakes made by the Supreme Court,” the group stated.

Abubakar said, “The Supreme Court is supreme and can creatively reinvent its rules to do justice. It is necessary do so now more than ever to save Nigerian democracy, constitutionalism and retrieve the judicial and justice system from its present opprobrium.”

The group said the apex court is left with no other option than to review and reverse the anomaly in the judgment, even if it means applying a judicial doctrine of necessity. (The Nation)